What the definition of “Production” bike?

My previous post about the most powerful “Production” bike got quite well responses, with many suggestion about “this” bike or “that” bike that have more power then the current HP (horse power) king, the BMW S1000RR.

I guess as the title suggest, the term “Production” bike need to be defined. Which bike is a “Production” bike, and which is not. Then we can come to conclusion which production bike is the most powerful of them all.

This post is about my personal definition of “Production” bike in sport bike 600cc and above, other may have their own definition about it, but if you don’t agree (or if you do) chime in!

For me the term “Production Bike” is for a bike that:

1. Have production units of 2,000 bikes.

Why 2,000 units? FIM has defined the WSBK as Production Bike race, and they have strict regulation to govern what bike can enter the series. The homologation process for WSBK series rules that one particular model need to have 2,000 production units before it can enter the series. Let take an example Ducati Desmosedici RR, the road going model of the powerful GP bike Ducati GP-6. Ducati only made 1,500 units of this bike. So it can not be homologated to enter the WSBK series, as it is less then the 2,000 production limit thus the Desmosedici is not a “Production” bike.

Other note, based on one Dyno result on Motorcyclist online, on rear wheel Desmosedici “only” gives 179.8 HP on rear wheel. 4 HP less then the S1000RR. So even if the Desmo is “Production” bike, is still not the most powerful.

2. Road legal from the factory/manufacturer.

It means that you can ride the bike on public road without fearing the cop might stop you because you don’t have brake light, rear view mirror, a head light, or otherΒ  mandatory parts required by law. You can off course strip it down for track and race purpose, but out from the dealer the bike is road legal.

Those two are my definition of “Production” bike. So if you ask if “Model A from Manufactur Z” is “Production bike”? Test it with the 2 points above.

END

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13 thoughts on “What the definition of “Production” bike?

  1. agree om Bona.. πŸ˜€
    so, Asphalt Rider Storm Bringer is not a “Production Bike”, it’s a Custom Bike based on Kawasaki ZX10R πŸ˜€

    what about Bimota??

  2. Mr.Bona, do you know why FIM limiting mass-production-motorcycle to be above 2000 units? I mean, why it has to be 2000 units. Why not 3000 or maybe 1,500 so the Ducati can enter the SBK race? πŸ™‚

    1. If I’m not mistaken FIM did recommend 3,000 units. But somehow lowered the numbers to 2,000.

      I’m not too sure the reason why FIM lowered the numbers, but I think the Japanese manufacturer for sure would love to have big numbers like 10,000 since they sells many R1, CBR, GSX or ZX.

      But I guess certain Italian manufacturer don’t like that and prefer to have the production numbers to be low. Selling 2,000 units of ultra expensive 1198R is tough job!

      1. I think, that is the different between Japan and Europe. Japanese always struggle with low cost, efficiency, productivity. While European always think better product, better technology.
        That’s why Japanese product always cheaper than European or American. CMIIW.

  3. Ya.. Ya..
    I got that πŸ˜€
    Now, i know d reason of why mv agusta don’t join for race in WSBK :mrgreen:

    1. they’re planned to join WSBK at 2008 with Carl Fogarty’s team, Foggy Racing..but somehow, they abandoned the plan..
      maybe they think, this bike is too expensive to be crashed on the track πŸ˜›

      1. i want to join the conversation, but unfortunately i dont speak english well..hikshiks.oke deh kalo beg beg beg begitoooo

  4. Yap..
    Dat bike’s so expnsive πŸ˜€
    In javanese langunge is
    ” eman-eman ”
    But the MV F4 is one of the most powerfull machine in da world, doesnt it? πŸ˜€
    Have u heard about the Moto Czysz C1
    American bike that using Z-line cylinder configuration?

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